Archive for March, 2011

From a logistical standpoint, moving to London wasn’t as difficult as I had imagined. Almost every year since 2004, I’ve packed up my belongings, evaluated my clothes, and moved into a new space. Flying to London is no different than flying to New York, Miami, or St. Louis. International and domestic travelers are together during the TSA screening process, my American Airlines gate was next to a gate for people heading to Tampa, and a bottle of water is still $4 at the newsstand.

Just like writing this blog post, I delayed and ignored the toughest thing on my to-do list: saying goodbye to everyone. I avoided it because as long as I didn’t say goodbye to people, boxing up my apartment was no different than the countless times I’ve moved and packing my bag was just like packing for a long vacation.

Flying over the Atlantic Ocean

When I started to say goodbye to people in my office, it finally hit that I was moving to London. I reminded people that I would still be in the company network and we would even have some overlap in our work days. We said Facebook would keep us connected and agreed that my visit to Chicago during the summer isn’t that far away. At the time, these conversations were “easy” because my apartment was still a mess and I had 1,001 things to do before my flight.

One of the people I spoke with was a person that connected me with my job in London. We celebrated for a moment, she wished me the best, reminded me to work hard, and then told me something no one else had mentioned, “This is going to be tough. It is going to be really difficult and it will take a month or so before it gets better. But hang in there. You can do it.”

She was right. This transition is difficult. Dealing with banks, understanding a new currency, finding a permanent address, learning a new phone system… and accidentally spending more on a sandwich than my temporary phone. (I’m not too frustrated, it was a really good sandwich.)

I'm pretty sure my phone was designed in 2003. It's key features include a "simple design, colourful screen and large, separated keys."

But life here hasn’t been all bad. I have great co-workers, I’m meeting people from around the world (e.g. Last night I went to a party with people from Germany, Italy, Australia, New Zealand, and Russia), I’m excited to travel, and I have great people, like you, supporting me.

Thank you for your support. Thank you for the Facebook messages, wall posts, Tweets, and text messages. This new stage in my life is easier because of friends like you.

I didn’t have time to give a proper goodbye to everyone in the States and I’m sorry. I tried to do small things like coffee, lunch, or drinks at night, but I didn’t have much time between the day my move went public and the morning I left for the UK. If I were to step back a few weeks, I wouldn’t have put off the goodbyes as long as I did. I hope you forgive my poor planning. It was the result of an overwhelmed person trying to pretend everything is normal.

I’d love to know everything going on at home. So feel free to send me an email or drop a note in the comments section below.

Cheers,

Joe

More than two and a half years ago, I moved to Chicago and embraced the city as my own. I’ve eaten some amazing food, watched the Blackhawks win the Stanley Cup, survived three football seasons as a Packers fan and met lifelong friends. I couldn’t have asked for a better way to start my post-college life.

The corner stone of my Windy City experience  is my office and my co-workers. The environment is challenging but nurturing, our clients are industry leaders, and the people I work with are intelligent, driven, and some of my best friends. I’ll never be able to replicate this group of people and the environment but I’m excited to say:

I’m moving to London.

Source

Where did this come from?

A few months ago I started searching for opportunities to diversify my experience and set myself apart from my peers. After a week in New York, I came back to Chicago and reached out to my mentors and the agency’s leadership for guidance. During one of these conversations, someone pointed out that my plan didn’t exactly line up with the goal. It was during this conversation that we started to talk about opportunities abroad and how to make the most of my skills.

When am I leaving and for how long?

My plane leaves Chicago on Saturday, March 19th, less than two weeks from today, and I’ll start working at Weber’s London office on Wednesday, March 23rd. My apartment in Chicago is already down to the bare minimum, thanks to Mama Piehl, and I’m quickly evaluating everything I own and deciding what will come with me. My work visa is for three years and near the  end of each year, I’ll evaluate my experience and work with the London office to determine if I’ll stay in the UK or move back to the US.

Am I nervous?

You bet! I’ve been looking for new opportunities since September and have been discussing logistics with London since the middle of January. You would think this is enough time to overcome any fear or doubt, however, the reality of my situation didn’t sink in until this past Wednesday when my friend Sami gave me a book about Chicago and wrote on the inside, “Now you get to keep some of Chicago with you!” Like a slap across the face, I finally felt the reality of my transition.

Thankfully, the timing couldn’t be better! My apartment lease is up at the end of this month, my family is tremendously supportive, and there is nothing permanent connecting me to Chicago. I’m going to miss my friends and it seems weird to move now that I’ve established myself in the city’s different networks and social circles, but my fear is that if I don’t do this now, I never will. As a fun bonus with this change, I’m able to cross off two of my 25 in 25 goals in one move: visit Europe and move some where new.

What’s next?

Packing and partying – but not necessarily in that order. Help packing is always wanted but it’s not expected. However, this upcoming Friday I’m tearing it up and enjoying my last weekend in Chicago. Location: TBD.

Cheers,

Joe

Windy City